NTPRS 2018 Conference, Day 2 – TPRS

Hi all! If you haven’t already, read my last post about Day One of the NTPRS conference for my summary of the Advanced track before you continue with this post, which is my summary of Day Two.

On Day Two, our workshop presenter, Jason Fritze, spent most of the day talking about Teaching Proficiency through Reading and Storytelling (TPRS). TPRS is a very powerful comprehensible input (CI) based second language teaching method invented by Blaine Ray. TPRS includes these three steps:

  1. Step One: Establish meaning. Usually, a TPRS teacher has certain structures in mind that s/he wishes to teach, so s/he establishes meaning of those target structures first. Using Total Physical Response (TPR), which I wrote about in my last post, is a good way to establish meaning. Teachers can also establish meaning through pictures, gestures, or direct English translation (If you would like to know my opinion about using translation in a second language class, read this post). Once the teacher has established meaning, s/he may start to ask students personal questions containing one of the structures. This technique is called Personalized Question and Answer (PQA). For example, pretend the teacher wishes to teach “likes to play.” With this is mind, the teacher might ask questions about who likes to play certain sports or instruments and compare what different students like to play. The teacher may also use circling techniques that I talked about in my last post along with PQA. Since students love to talk about themselves, PQA is a highly engaging activity. And since teachers and students learn all kids of personal information about each other, it is also a great community builder. Jason and Linda Li make PQA look effortless, but Jason pointed out that PQA questions are much more powerful and entertaining when scripted ahead of time.
  2. Step Two: Ask a story. More experienced TPRS teachers can spin PQA into a story. This is what Linda Li did when she came to do more Mandarin with us. On Day One Linda had spent most of her time teaching us some structures such as “has” and “looks at” and “happy.” Then today she took those structures and wove them into a story about someone who is unhappy because he does not have an iPhone. Since he doesn’t have an iPhone, he can’t look at his pretty friend via FaceTime. Linda had some workshop participants come up and be student actors. At first when they had to say something, Linda stood behind their back and had them move their mouth to make it look as if they were speaking while she said the Mandarin words. Then later on students said the words themselves with some prompting from Linda when they felt more comfortable. Jason Fritze suggests that all teachers keep a “back-up” story in case the story spun as a result of PQA falls flat.
  3. Step Three: Read. Once we finished acting out the story, our next step was to review the story through reading. As we discussed what happened in our story, Linda wrote it down for us so we could see and read it. Reading is an essential step in the TPRS process because it ties everything together, reinforces what we have already heard, and compliments our spoken input by providing written input. Jason Fritze said that it is important to establish class procedures and expectations before the class reads. In Jason’s class, students are expected to look at the page and follow along as Jason reads the story. Students who need extra support are offered Post-Its, bookmarks, or highlighters to help them focus. Sometimes the class does whole group reading and sometimes the students do partner reading. Along with reading the text, checking for comprehension is also important. One way to check reading comprehension is to have the class translate chorally in their native language (L1) after the teacher or a student reads in the second language (L2). Another good strategy to check reading comprehension is for teachers to start reading a sentence in the L2 and have the students finish that sentence in the L2. Teachers can also do a spot check for comprehension by occasionally stopping while reading to ask students to produce a gesture to represent certain words.

TPRS has been around since the 1980’s, so many materials are available to teachers who want to use TPRS in their classrooms but don’t have the desire or improvisational skills to create their own stories. Most textbooks these days include a TPRS reader with their ancillary materials. I have never been a fan of those stories, but they are a decent place to start, especially for teachers who are still expected to teach from a textbook. In addition, TPRS Books has lots of resources available, including entire curriculum packages in multiple languages. Jim Tripp has created a set of TPRS stories that are available on his website, and Anna Matava has a book of story scripts in English that are available through Teacher’s Discovery.

In addition, TPRS Books spends a large part of their year traveling throughout the United States and Canada hosting TPRS workshops. So if the national conference (which will be in the Chicago area next year) is not possible, chances are you can find a smaller, more affordable one closer to home. And in some cases, if you can get a group of more than 30 teachers, the boys at TPRS Books may come out and host a free workshop for you and your colleagues! So what do you have to lose? Give TPRS a try!

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